Esther Reed ////// 212

8 comments

  • Kaleigh

    Kaleigh Dallas, TX

    When Ester was little, her momma told her she could be whoever she wanted to be. Jennifer, Brooke, maybe even different versions of Natalie.

    When Ester was little, her momma told her she could be whoever she wanted to be. Jennifer, Brooke, maybe even different versions of Natalie.

  • Mark

    Mark tX

    The idea that the government threatened her with 57 years is a joke, her crimes were not nearly deserving of that. This is how our government works today, threatens you with a ridiculously long sentence if you go to trial and then offers you a plea bargain out. Not about justice, it is extortion.

    The idea that the government threatened her with 57 years is a joke, her crimes were not nearly deserving of that. This is how our government works today, threatens you with a ridiculously long sentence if you go to trial and then offers you a plea bargain out. Not about justice, it is extortion.

  • Sharon

    Sharon Chicago

    Please don’t say ATM machine... that means Automatic Teller Machine Machine. Love your podcasts btw! Keep up the great work!

    Please don’t say ATM machine... that means Automatic Teller Machine Machine. Love your podcasts btw! Keep up the great work!

  • Meg

    Meg Wisconsin

    My identification was stolen in a manner very similar to what Esther did- except it happened to me in the early 90's. I never found out whether the person (who got my social security number from the house we bought from "her") was ever caught and prosecuted. She got credit cards under my name; even "married me off" by using other names and SSN of other ID theft victims. Because much of the crime involved mail orders and credit cards, law enforcement agencies argued about who had jurisdiction. Credit card companies didn't care because they would just raise their rates. It wasn't until mid to late 90's that companies (health, schools, etc) started using numbers other than SSN to keep track of records. At any rate, the person that did the most at the time was the Postmaster General who traced some of the addresses to South Carolina. What a mess- but nobody got murdered or went missing- as far as I know. Identity thieves are alive and well and taking advantage of innocent people.

    My identification was stolen in a manner very similar to what Esther did- except it happened to me in the early 90's. I never found out whether the person (who got my social security number from the house we bought from "her") was ever caught and prosecuted. She got credit cards under my name; even "married me off" by using other names and SSN of other ID theft victims. Because much of the crime involved mail orders and credit cards, law enforcement agencies argued about who had jurisdiction. Credit card companies didn't care because they would just raise their rates. It wasn't until mid to late 90's that companies (health, schools, etc) started using numbers other than SSN to keep track of records. At any rate, the person that did the most at the time was the Postmaster General who traced some of the addresses to South Carolina. What a mess- but nobody got murdered or went missing- as far as I know. Identity thieves are alive and well and taking advantage of innocent people.

  • Michelle

    Michelle Durham, NC

    Thanks for covering this case. She sounds like a classic psychopath, without concern or care for the emotional harm she did to the families of her victims. While I agree she shouldn't be locked up for a long time, I think criminals like this should be made to do some old-school hard labor. Like, build prisons, make bricks, or pick up trash for 20 years.

    Thanks for covering this case. She sounds like a classic psychopath, without concern or care for the emotional harm she did to the families of her victims. While I agree she shouldn't be locked up for a long time, I think criminals like this should be made to do some old-school hard labor. Like, build prisons, make bricks, or pick up trash for 20 years.

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    Yes - pick up trash! If we can all stop littering - then make bricks. Michelle I love ya but let's build schools instead - hopefully we will need less prisons. Cheers Nic

    Yes - pick up trash! If we can all stop littering - then make bricks. Michelle I love ya but let's build schools instead - hopefully we will need less prisons.
    Cheers Nic

  • John

    John Minnesota

    Mark in tx. No, that’s not how it works. Reed was charged/pleaded to mail fraud (1 count), wire fraud (1 count), false statements (1 count), and aggravated ID theft (1 count). The fraud charges have a statutory maximum of 20 years, false statements is 5 years, and ID theft is 2. If you add all that up, it’s 47 years. But, virtually nobody ever gets the stat max and the government very rarely seeks it. More importantly, virtually nobody gets consecutive sentences on charges that are based on the same course of conduct (I.e., one single scheme that broke multiple laws). Instead, they get a sentence on each charge and those sentences are run concurrently. So, the 47 years mentioned in the story is completely irrelevant. The way it really works is under the federal Sentencing Guidelines, a number of factors are considered that then get converted into an “offense level,” which corresponds with a recommended range of imprisonment (e.g., in a fraud case, maybe 51-73 months). One of the factors affecting the offense level is whether the defendant accepts responsibility. If they do, the get a reduction that usually corresponds to about a year or so off the recommended range of imprisonment. The long story short is that, no, the government doesn’t extort people into pleading guilty. It does provide a relatively modest reward to those people who accept responsibility, show remorse, and plead guilty for the crime they committed, and that is a good thing because it saves resources and permits society to realize the benefit of a defendant who admits wrongdoing and stones for it.

    Mark in tx. No, that’s not how it works. Reed was charged/pleaded to mail fraud (1 count), wire fraud (1 count), false statements (1 count), and aggravated ID theft (1 count). The fraud charges have a statutory maximum of 20 years, false statements is 5 years, and ID theft is 2. If you add all that up, it’s 47 years. But, virtually nobody ever gets the stat max and the government very rarely seeks it. More importantly, virtually nobody gets consecutive sentences on charges that are based on the same course of conduct (I.e., one single scheme that broke multiple laws). Instead, they get a sentence on each charge and those sentences are run concurrently. So, the 47 years mentioned in the story is completely irrelevant. The way it really works is under the federal Sentencing Guidelines, a number of factors are considered that then get converted into an “offense level,” which corresponds with a recommended range of imprisonment (e.g., in a fraud case, maybe 51-73 months). One of the factors affecting the offense level is whether the defendant accepts responsibility. If they do, the get a reduction that usually corresponds to about a year or so off the recommended range of imprisonment. The long story short is that, no, the government doesn’t extort people into pleading guilty. It does provide a relatively modest reward to those people who accept responsibility, show remorse, and plead guilty for the crime they committed, and that is a good thing because it saves resources and permits society to realize the benefit of a defendant who admits wrongdoing and stones for it.

  • Jason

    Jason Lincoln

    It would be so wild if she was involved in the Lane Bryant shooting. So many questions could be answered.

    It would be so wild if she was involved in the Lane Bryant shooting. So many questions could be answered.

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